BlindAlive.com

Accessible Fitness, more choices for more people

Fitness has always been a concern with regard to both mental and physical health regardless of age, gender, or any other variables that make each one of us unique. And for those in the blind community, fitness is every bit as much—if not more—important.

Exercise for the visually impaired is something that should be incorporated into a weekly, if not daily, routine for a variety of reasons that are both similar and different from people within the sighted community. For those with total loss of sight as well as for those who are low sighted, a lack of regular exercise can bring on a host of other issues, including weight gain, sluggishness, and perhaps worst of all for many, insomnia or a circadian rhythm that has been thrown completely off track.

A quality workout done at the right time of day and at the right pace to meet your unique physical and mental needs is just what the doctor may have forgotten to order. For many blind people, fitness has been a challenge: without someone to guide you and without the ability to drive yourself to the gym, it becomes obvious why so many visually impaired individuals give up—but with the BlindAlive line of Fitness Workouts for blind people, you’ll never have to depend on anyone else again.

Yoga and Strength Training with wieghts for blind people along with a variety of other cardiovascular exercises help our bodies stay toned, help us gain muscle mass and lose weight, but most of all, can help lead a blind person away from a sense of helplessness.

Are you ready to sweat? Come get healthy and leave all your notions of not being able to get fit due to your visual impairment behind with BlindAlive!

Reading with Purpose

I have been an avid reader for most of my life,and when I'm not enjoying a good novel -- what some call escapist fiction -- I'm reading books about self-improvement. If you were to live with me, day in and day out, you'd think those books weren't doing me much good. The really unfortunate thing is that, for the most part, you would be right.
I will often be inspired or excited by something I read, and I have the very best of intentions to make it a part of my daily life. Then, I get really busy, or involved in a time-consuming project, or I read another motivational book, and all the fantastic, useful information I've read gets shelved, if you'll excuse the bad pun. What good is it if I spend my time, and sometimes my money, on a book I think is the very epitomy of transformational advice if I don't put it into practice?
I've given this some thought lately, and wanted to share some things I am beginning to do to get the most from my current reads.
I started by making a list of the memorable books I read, but had never implemented. I did not browse through my download history, but just wrote down a few titles I read at some point in the past. Thinking of them made me feel a sense of regret that I had not done more with the material. I came up with three books, which I plan to reread in the near future. To keep this from being an obligation that leaves you feeling flattened, try limiting yourself to five or fewer books.
I resolved to listen to the author. When I come across phrases like "Practice exercise," "Don't read on until you've done this," or "Make a list," I'm actually stopping to do it. I know that if I say I'll come back to it, or I half-heartedly make a list in my head instead of actually capturing it somewhere, it won't happen. I'm sure the author did not just build in practice exercises for no good reason. It is likely that these same activities were used by the author to become successfull in the areas about which he or she is writing. If I'm investing the time to read the book, I can at least make time to try what the author suggests.
I'm learning to slow down. Sometimes, a book contains so many practical and helpful suggestions, I read it through without stopping. It's the equivalent of gulping half a gallon of cold water on a hot day. It will do some good, but the real benefit comes from taking it slowly. Now, I try to reserve my reading binges for fiction, and take the time to live with a helpful book for a couple days, or even a couple weeks so I can really integrate its practices into my daily life.
Finally, I'm learning to take notes on what I read. This doesn't mean I need to write a complete outline of the book, but I should at least jot down anything I find particularly helpful. I am reading more audio books than ever, and while they are great, it is sometimes hard to go back and search for that sought-after bit of information. Taking notes gives me quick access to those parts of a book I value most. What's more, the act of writing things down helps to cement them in my mind.
Have you ever been so caught up in a plan of action or a premise that you don't see its faults? Critical thinking has not come naturally to me, but is something I have had to cultivate. I find that distilling the premise or plan outlined in a book to just a few thoughts or sentences is like shining a spotlight on it. The flaws are made more visible, and the gems shine like the jewels they truly are.
Do you have a strategy for implementing what you read that I didn't mention here? If so, please feel free to email support@BlindAlive.com and share it, or post to our Facebook group. Here's wishing you a happy, transformative reading experience!

 

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