BlindAlive.com

Accessible Fitness, more choices for more people

Fitness has always been a concern with regard to both mental and physical health regardless of age, gender, or any other variables that make each one of us unique. And for those in the blind community, fitness is every bit as much—if not more—important.

Exercise for the visually impaired is something that should be incorporated into a weekly, if not daily, routine for a variety of reasons that are both similar and different from people within the sighted community. For those with total loss of sight as well as for those who are low sighted, a lack of regular exercise can bring on a host of other issues, including weight gain, sluggishness, and perhaps worst of all for many, insomnia or a circadian rhythm that has been thrown completely off track.

A quality workout done at the right time of day and at the right pace to meet your unique physical and mental needs is just what the doctor may have forgotten to order. For many blind people, fitness has been a challenge: without someone to guide you and without the ability to drive yourself to the gym, it becomes obvious why so many visually impaired individuals give up—but with the BlindAlive line of Fitness Workouts for blind people, you’ll never have to depend on anyone else again.

Yoga and Strength Training with wieghts for blind people along with a variety of other cardiovascular exercises help our bodies stay toned, help us gain muscle mass and lose weight, but most of all, can help lead a blind person away from a sense of helplessness.

Are you ready to sweat? Come get healthy and leave all your notions of not being able to get fit due to your visual impairment behind with BlindAlive!

Being Blind In The Kitchen

I am blind.

This is not a statement of truth that came easily to me. My vision has slowly dimmed over the past 57 years. I could “pass as sighted” up until a few years ago. I had to make a conscious decision to begin using the word “blind” to describe myself.

Well, I am over it, for the most part. I have learned to just say, “I’m blind” whenever I meet a new person, or anytime a situation could become awkward. I have even learned to laugh instead of cry when something embarrassing happens.

I can’t tell you how many times I have poured hot coffee in an upside down mug or poured it into an already filled mug. That was more a problem of sleepiness and inattention rather than blindness but I doubt it would have happened if I could see. I have also poured chicken broth into my coffee instead of almond milk. This too was due to an unorganized refrigerator and just not thinking to give it a sniff before pouring. These are just my coffee stories.

A few Thanksgivings ago I started a new tradition. I cut up sweet potatoes with one of my favorite knives. I was very attached to this knife. Well, after the potatoes had been cooking for a while, I noticed an interesting fragrance coming from the oven. I tried to deny it but finally I had to check. The knife was melting right along side of the potatoes. I was mad at myself for doing it, but at the same time, we all had a good laugh. Now, when we cook sweet potatoes, my family says, “Don’t forget the knife.” I still have that knife, with what I call, “the artistic handle.”

I have lots of blindness in the kitchen stories. I put beer in my 5 year olds’ lunch bag. You can read this blog post call “Beer Not Lemonade” on my website.

I also stored the ground beef in the pantry thinking it was flour. That was just gross but it makes for a good story now.

There was a time when I would not have dared share these stories. I would have gotten teary and disappeared until I could get a grip on my emotions. I had to consciously decide to get over it and to declare to myself. I am blind and I am not ashamed! It took some practice but I can say it now and know that it is the truth. I am learning to accept blindness. The more I accept it, the easier it is to laugh at the situations in which I find myself. Now, I actually enjoy telling these stories.

I would love to hear your blind in the kitchen stories. You can comment on our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter, or join our BlindAlive Community on Facebook. Or email me at mel@blindalive.com. If I can help you overcome any difficulty and we can laugh together, that would be a good thing.

Good Health to You,
Mel Scott